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 Oggetto del messaggio: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 11:34 
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"The Restoration Warship - The design, construction and career of a third rate of Charles II's Navy"

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Buongiorno a tutti i magellanesi.

Alcuni mesi fa ho acquistato su Amazon il libro che vorrei recensire in questo spazio. Si intitola "The Restoration Warship - The design, construction and career of a third rate of Charles II's Navy". L'autore si chiama Richard Endsor. Richard, che ho avuto il piacere di conoscere tramite frequenti scambi di email ha devoluto molto tempo negli ultimi anni nella ricerca sulle navu inglesi del 17° secolo e sulle pratiche contemporanee di costruzione. Questo libro è il risultato di 12 anni di ricerche. In pratica questo libro è una monografia completa della nave della marina inglese Lenox.

L'acquisto venne fatto quando ancora non esisteva Amazon.it, quindi ho fatto l'ordine su Amazon.co.uk. Il costo, tutto incluso, è stato di £35,86, grosso modo €40 a quei tempi. In esso sono contenuti dei piani in scala 1:72 del veliero con tutte le informazione di base per la sua costruzione.

Non nego che leggendo questo libro mi sono affezionato a questa nave, che ha comunque una trentina di gemelle, citate qui sotto, del tutto simili come linee a parte le decorazioni di poppa e la presenza di una cannoniera in più sul ponte superiore in alcuni di esse.

Lenox 70 (1678)
Hampton Court 70 (1678)
Anne 70 (1678) – Burnt 1690
Captain 70 (1678)
Restoration 70 (1678) – wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
Berwick 70 (1679)
Burford 70 (1679)
Eagle 70 (1679)
Expedition 70 (1679) – renamed Prince Frederick 1715, sold 1784
Grafton 70 (1679)
Pendennis 70 (1679) – wrecked 1689
Northumberland 70 (1679) – wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
Essex 70 (1679) – broken up 1736 for rebuild
Kent 70 (1679)
Exeter 70 (1680) – hulked 1691
Suffolk 70 (1680) – broken up by 1765
Hope 70 (1678) – captured 1695
Elizabeth 70 (1679) – rebuilt 1703
Stirling Castle 70 (1679) – wrecked in the Great Storm of 1703
Breda 70 (c. 1679) – burnt 1690


Alcune immagini del contenuto del libro, con anche l'indice degli argomenti trattati:

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Cita:
The book, edited by Conway, introduces a comprehensive and expertly illustrated history of HMS Lenox, a 70-gun third rate of Charles II's Navy. Laid down in 1677, Lenox represents the pinnacle of English shipbuilding practice and, in many ways, typifies all third-rate ships of the period, which were by far the most numerous class of warship in the seventeenth century, and formed the backbone of the English fleet.
Lenox was ordered as the first of the King's 'Thirty Ships' building programme, a series of beautiful and powerful warships that were intended to reflect the glory and majesty of the monarch.Their graceful lines and ornate decoration made these ships ideal subjects for study - sketches were made, for example, by the famous artist Van de Velde, one of the fathers of the marine painting genre. Unsurprisingly, they remain a source of fascination for ship modellers today, and their construction in a time of huge international significance, during the Anglo-Dutch Wars of 1660-1685 and midway through Louis XIV's massive expansion programme for the French Navy, means there is great interest in this subject amongst historians.
Employing extensive primary research, author Richard Endsor has produced one of the most detailed building and career histories of any vessel, in turn making a major contribution to modern understanding of English shipbuilding practice during the Restoration period.Every aspect of Lenox is covered in great detail, from initial design and construction to armament, fitting out and her later career. The book provides a broad picture of the day-to-day workings of Deptford dockyard, including the techniques, trade and tools of the shipwrights, sail-makers and rope-makers. It simultaneously demonstrates a very keen insight into the workings of naval administration. Construction of Lenox and her sisters was largely down to Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist and Secretary to the Admiralty, who considered the Thirty Ships programme to be 'the greatest achievement of my career'.Pepys figures as a key character in the context of Lenox's design, construction and build, and indeed such human interest is woven throughout. Employing original documents, individuals are shown to have influenced many aspects of the ship, which in turn, through this work, has now reserved its own place in maritime scholarship.
"The Restoration Warship" will justifiably enter the canon of standard reference works on shipbuilding practice in the age of sail. It features a major contribution to modern understanding of shipbuilding techniques in the age of sail. It is comprehensively researched using primary sources and original documents. It is beautifully illustrated with the author's own plans, paintings and sketches. It presents one of the most detailed building & career histories of any sailing warship.


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Cita:
Endsor is concerned with a single, emblematic warship which manages to sum up the characteristic mix of public and private interests that drove the Restoration State. As artist and author, in the manner of Jean Boudriot, he has produced a large handsome book about the 70-gun 3rd rate HMS Lenox, filled with excellent detailed drawings, ranging from ships and masts to deck fittings and cannon... Built at Deptford Dockyard by master-shipwright John Shish, every detail of the design, construction and service life of the 1000-ton Lenox has been traced by Endsor using remarkably rich archival resources generated by the Pepsian naval administration... Endsor skilfully situates the ship s activities with the War of the League of Augsburg (1688-1697), highlighting the main actions, the meaning of the 1688 Revolution... The Appendices provide a highly detailed resume of the ships facts and figures, and key documents from her construction and refits at Chatham. Endsor s book is a testament to the wealth of documentary, artistic and technical material that has survived from the Restoration. Evidence which Pepys preserved to prove he had done a good job is now transforming the way we understand the navy at a critical moment in English history. He has brought to life a ship built 300 years ago, allowing us to understand that such ships were built, and fought, as complex machines integrating technical systems, trained manpower and money to achieve national objects. In this context the structure, fittings and fixtures of the ship take on a much greater significance than bare facts might suggest. Restoration Warship will be essential reading for students of the 16th-17th-and 18th-century navies: for students of ship-technology, design and operations. For those who may encounter the remains of such vessels the excellent drawings and pictures provide a new level of access to critical points of the structure. Artist/author, publisher and printer are to be congratulated on a landmark work that integrates text and image at the highest level. --Andrew Lambert, Professor of War Studies, King s College, London

This is a classic example of how the wider naval historical community can enable its members to produce first class work... Endsor covers this story in absolutely amazing detail. The book is a veritable triumph of research into all aspects of naval life in the late 17th Century, with Lenox as the perfect hook on which to hang the analysis. There is fascinating material on, timber supply, shipbuilding and shipbuilders; (including detailed analysis of shipwright productivity )...The author also fully understands the political background of the period when connection, religion and faction dominated appointment of officers. The day of the apolitical servant of the sate was still a long way off. The book shows that its publisher Conway, now taken over by Anova Press, has lost none of its ability to produce a very handsome book. It is exceptionally well illustrated with impressive fold out plans of the ship, deck by deck, and diagrams of every aspect of her fittings. The colour plates are excellent and I rather liked the sepia tones used for the rest of the book which gave a suitable period feel to it. The price asked is not an unreasonable one for such a beautiful volume. --Professor Eric Grove, Professor of Naval History, University of Salford

The subject of this book, HMS Lenox, may seem to be an innocuous and commonplace late seventeenth-century ship-of-the-line but when her conception, construction and career are examined in the detail that Richard Endsor lavishes on her she assumes a particular importance... The book now guides us through the process of building Lenox and I could not find any matter related to wooded ship construction of the period that the author did not describe in detail...Of course the usual subjects of construction, masting, rigging, fitting of sails, ordnance, boats, capstans, small arms and so forth are all dealt with but for most of these subjects the author has been able to find more and intriguingly different information than usual. For example dockyard facilities and the working, and living conditions of the shipbuilding tradesmen are fully described...we are given a detailed service history that goes beyond the usual rebuilds and battles fought but shows us how her officers and crew lived and worked, what was expected of them and what they could expect in return...The most important illustrations in the book are, however, the author s own as his abilities go beyond the expected research and writing skills. He is an accomplished draughtsman and artist and a comprehensive set of scale drawings, that will easily satisfy a model maker, along with a number of his own paintings of the vessel, are included. They are all well executed and are, perhaps, the most attractive feature of the work. Further, Lenox s builder was expected to produce written reports of the ship s building progress every Friday and Endsor has included sketches that show this progress and with these the reader can see at a glance how the vessel was constructed. --John McKay, International Journal of Maritime History, Volume XXII, Number 1 (June 2010)



Cita:
About the Author: for a living Richard Endsor designs computer models for various scientific applications. He is very well known on the maritime history conference/research scene and also lectures widely on various maritime topics. This project has taken twelve years to research and write in which time the author has taught himself to draw and paint to a very high level as evidenced by the illustrations in this volume. He lives in High Wycombe.


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 13:11 
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Iscritto il: 01/10/2009, 11:31
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cognome e nome: Ci. Vi.
Ciao Jack non si vedono le foto.


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 13:14 
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Riprova, stavo modificando il sistema. Jack.


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 13:24 
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Tutto ok grazie Jack.


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 14:01 
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Aggiungo altre immagini del libro.

Volevo inoltre informare che, dopo aver letto questo volume, ho iniziato un progetto per il prossimo futuro, finalizzato alla costruzione di questo veliero. Per il momento mi sto trastullando con il libro e con AutoCAD per ottenere dei disegni in scala di mio interersse . . .ma di questo avremo modo di parlarne in futuro in modo più organico.

Per adesso altre immagini del volume . . .

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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 12/04/2014, 16:00 
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Altre cinque immagini tratte dal volume.

Fra qualche giorno, spero comunque molto presto, capirete perchè mi sto "assatanando" con questo libro . . . Saluti, Jack.

01 Immagine

02 Immagine

03 Immagine

04 Immagine

05 Immagine


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 13/04/2014, 15:12 
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Il buon Richard Endsor, autore di questo libro, è anche un più che valido pittore: utilizzando come base di partenza gli schizzi dei famosi pittori fiamminghi Van de Velde padre e figlio, ha eseguito dei pregevoli dipinti del Lenox e gemelli.

Qui sotto alcuni suoi dipinti che sono riuscito a trovare in rete.

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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 13/04/2014, 18:04 
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Sempre in questo volume sono presenti alcune immagini di schizzi eseguiti dai due citati pittori fiamminghi Van de Velde padre e figlio che ho poi prontamente ritrovato su internet. Tutte ritraggono il Lenox in diverse (scusate il termine che ricorda qualcos'altro) "posizioni".

Questa la biografia di Van de Velde padre (in inglese purtroppo):
Cita:
Willem van de Velde the Elder (c. 1611 – 13 December 1693) was a Dutch Golden Age seascape painter; known as the Elder, a marine draughtsman and painter, was born in Leiden, the son of a Flemish skipper, Willem Willemsz. van de Velde, and is commonly said to have been bred to the sea. In 1706 Bainbrigg Buckeridge noted that he “understood navigation very well”. He married Judith Adriaensdochter van Leeuwen in Leiden, the Netherlands, in 1631.
His three known legitimate children were named Magdalena, born 1632; Willem, known as the Younger, also a marine painter, born 1633; and Adriaen, a landscape painter, born 1636.
His marriage was stormy, at least in its later years. David Cordingly relates that Willem the Elder fathered two children out of wedlock in 1653, one “by his maidservant, and the other by her friend. Nine years later the Elder and his wife went through a legal separation, ‘on account of legal disputes and the most violent quarrels’. The immediate cause of the dispute was his affair with a married woman.” Michael S. Robinson noted that “on 17/27 July 1662, he and his wife agreed to part. A condition of the separation was that the Elder could recover from his son Adriaen ‘two royal gifts’, presumably gifts from Charles II for work done in England.” Cordingly’s account further relates that the dispute was still continuing after another ten years, since “in the autumn of 1672 Judith complained to the woman’s husband.” Robinson adds that by 1674 the couple “must have been reconciled”, for at a chance meeting with Pieter Blaeu in Amsterdam in July the Elder explained that he was only visiting for a few days “in order to fetch his wife”. His son, Adriaen, had died in Amsterdam in 1672, and Willem the Elder was also fetching his grandson, similarly named Adriaen, who was then aged two.
After his move to England, the exact date of which is uncertain, but reportedly at the end of 1672 or beginning of 1673, he is said to have lived with his family in East Lane, Greenwich, and to have used the Queen’s House, now part of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, as a studio. Following the accession of William and Mary as King and Queen of England, it appears that this facility was no longer provided, and by 1691 he was living in Sackville Street, now close to Piccadilly Circus. He died in London, and was buried in St James’s Church, at the south end of the street.


A proposito di Van De Velde giovane:
Cita:
Willem van de Velde il Giovane (Leida, dicembre 1633 – Londra, 6 aprile 1707) è stato un pittore olandese.
Fu artista di vedute marine come il padre Willem van de Velde il Vecchio, mentre il fratello Adraien van de Velde si specializzò in paesaggi e figure di animali. Inizialmente fu istruito dal padre e in seguito da Simon de Vlieger, pure artista di marine. Dal 1652 è documentato ad Amsterdam e nel 1672/1673, assieme al padre, entrò a servizio di Carlo II d'Inghilterra e dal 1691 visse alla Westminster, dove morì nel 1707.
La sua opera segnò il culmine del genere della marina olandese nel corso del XVII secolo, grazie anche alla perfetta conoscenza delle tecniche navali e alla padronanza del disegno, della luce e degli effetti atmosferici e climatici. Probabilmente, quale abile disegnatore, fu testimone alle battaglie navali tra le marine olandese e inglese, che riprodusse in composizioni armoniose e capaci di trasmettere le emozioni del momento. Notevole è la resa anche di scene di tempesta o calme vedute nei pressi dei porti o della costa.


Ecco ora alcuni schizzi del Lenox, ad essi riconducibili.

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continua . . .


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 06/05/2014, 14:54 
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Iscritto il: 18/02/2009, 13:42
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Capperi Jack sei forte più che mai!
In bocca allo storione!|
Ciao
OLI


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 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: The Restoration Warship - Richard Endsor
MessaggioInviato: 06/05/2014, 20:26 
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Iscritto il: 29/01/2011, 17:28
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cognome e nome: Scrignoli Stefano
Se ho capito bene, mancano i disegni per l'alberatura e altri dettagli?
Ci sono tutti i dettagli per farla in arsenale?


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